Scotland's History, Legends, Wildlife and Hunting Practices...because the past lives in us and guides our footsteps.
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SCOTLAND’S STORY

A HISTORY OF SCOTLAND
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS

BY H. E. MARSHALL

WITH PICTURES BY

J. R. SKELTON, JOHN HASSALL

AND J. SHAW CROMPTON

A warrior of Scotland

THOMAS NELSON AND SONS Ltd.

LONDON EDINBURGH PARIS MELBOURNE
TORONTO AND NEW YORK


TO
WINIFRED AND DORIS

 


[ ILLUSTRATIONS in Scotland's Story ]

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

‘HOLD YOU, HOLD YOU, BRAVE WALLACE ! THE ENGLISH

HAVE HANGED ALL YOUR BEST MEN LIKE DOGSFrontispiece

AT PAGE

ST. COLUMBA MADE THE SIGN OF THE CROSS, AND THE

GREAT GATES OPENED WIDE . . . . . 16

‘DO YOU SEE THAT LITTLE WHITE SAIL FAR OUT TO SEA?

YONDER IS MACDUFF’ . . . . . . 44

THERE STEPPED FROM OUT THE CROWD AN OLD, OLD

MAN . . . . . . . . . . 86

AT NIGHT, WHEN THEY GATHERED ROUND THE WATCH-
FIRES, THE KING WOULD READ STORIES OUT OF OLD
BOOKS . . . . . . . . 140

FULL OF NEW HOPE BRUCE SPRANG TO LAND          .          . 144

BRUCE BROUGHT HIS BATTLE-AXE CRASHING DOWN UPON

THE HEAD OF BOHUN ... . . . . 174

WHEN A STONE HIT THE WALLS, BLACK AGNES WOULD
BID HER MAIDS WIPE THE SPOT WITH A CLEAN
WHITE CLOTH . . . . . . . . 192

‘BUT THANKS BE TO GOD, THERE ARE FEW OF MY

ANCESTORS WHO HAVE DIED IN THEIR BEDS’ . . 204

FOR THERE IN THE GARDEN WALKED THE FAIREST LADY

HE HAD EVER SEEN . . . . . . . 226

xv


xvi                   SCOTLAND’S STORY

AT PAGE

BRAVE CATHERINE TRIED IN VAIN TO KEEP THEM BACK . 234

A HALTER WOULD BETTER BECOME YOU’ .          .          . 256

SIR ANDREW, WITH HIS TWO SHIPS, THE ‘ YELLOW CARVEL’

AND THE ‘ FLOWER,’ BEAT FIVE OF THE ENGLISH . 266

THE TRAMPLE OF HORSESHOOFS AND THE LOWING OF

CATTLE . . . . . . . . . . 286

IN SOME SUNNY PALACE GARDEN THE DAYS PASSED

HAPPILY FOR THE QUEEN AND HER MARIES .           . 300

QUEEN MARY AND KNOX HAD MANY TALKS TOGETHER . 304

THE MARQUIS LOOKED SO HANDSOME, GRAND, AND GRAVE,

THAT EVERY ONE WAS FULL OF SAD ASTONISHMENT 346

WHILE THE MINISTER PREACHED AND PRAYED, SENTINELS

KEPT WATCH . . . . . . . . 358

THE FLAGS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM .          .          .          . 386

‘ GENTLEMEN,’ HE CRIED, DRAWING HIS SWORD, ‘I HAVE

THROWN AWAY THE SCABBARD’ . . . . . 400


[ CONTENTS TO SCOTLAND'S STORY ]

CONTENTS

CHAP.                                                                                                                                                                                         PAGE

I. THE STORY OF PRINCE GATHELUS ....         1

II. A FIGHT WITH THE ROMANS .....         5

III. THE MARCH OF THE ROMANS.....       10

IV. THE STORY OF SAINT COLUMBA ....       14

V. HOW THE FRENCH AND THE SCOTS BECAME

FRIENDS ........       19

VI. THE LAST OF THE PICTIS......       24

VII. HOW A PLOUGHMAN WON A BATTLE ....       29

VIII. MACBETH AND THE THREE WEIRD SISTERS . .       83

IX. MACBETH—THE MURDER OF BANQUO ....       87
X. MACBETH HOW THE THANE OF FIFE WENT TO

ENGLAND........       41

XL MACBETH HOW BIRNAM WOOD CAME TO DUNSI-

NANE.........       45

XII. MALCOLM CANMORE—HOW THE KING OVERCAME A

TRAITOR........       50

XIII.  MAIXX)LM CANMORE—HOW SAINT MARGARET CAME

TO SCOTLAND.......       55

XIV.  THE STORY OF PIERCE-EYE.....       61
XV. THE REIGNS OF DONALD BANE, DUNCAN, AND EDGAR
       65

XVI. ALEXANDER I., THE FIERCE.....       67
X
VII. DAVID I., THE SORE SAINTTHE BATTLE OF THE

STANDARD .......       70

XVIII. WILLIAM I., THE LION......       78

ix


x                     SCOTLAND’S STORY

CHAP.                                                                                                                                                                                   PAGE

XIX. THE STORY OF ALEXANDER II.....         . 82

XX. ALEXANDER III.-HOW THE LITTLE KING WAS

CROWNED AND MARRIED....         . 86

XXI. ALEXANDER III.—THE TAMING OF THE RAVENS . 90
XXII.
ALEXANDER III.HOW A BEAUTIFUL LADY TOOK

A BRAVE KNIGHT PRISONER....          94

XXIII.  ALEXANDER III.HOW THE KING RODE HOME­

WARD THROUGH THE DARK NIGHT.. . 98

XXIVTHE MAID OF NORWAY ....         . . .101
XXV. JOHN BALIOL—THE SIEGE OF BERWICK . . 104

XXVI. JOHN BALIOL—THE LAST OF TOOM TABARD          .     108

XXVII. THE ADVENTURES OF SIR WILLIAM WALLACE .     110
XXVIII. WILLIAM WALLACE THE BLACK PARLIAMENT

OF AYR........       116

XXIX. WILLIAM WALLACE THE BATTLE OF STIRLING

BRIDGE....         . ...      118

XXX. WILLIAM WALLACE—THE BATTLE OF FALKIRK .     121

XXXI. WILLIAM WALLACE—THE TURNING OF A LOAF .      127

XXXII.  ROBERT THE BRUCE—HOW THE BRUCE RECEIVED

A LETTER AND STRUCK A BLOW .           .          .131

XXXIII.  ROBERT THE BRUCE — HOW THE KING WAS

CROWNED....         . ...136

XXXIV.  ROBERT THE BRUCE — IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T

SUCCEED, TRY AGAIN....         .      140

XXXV. ROBERT THE BRUCE—THE KING TRIES AGAIN .     144

XXXVI. ROBERT THE BRUCE—THE FIGHT AT THE FORD .      149
XXX
VII. ROBERT THE BRUCE —HOW THE KING ESCAPED
FROM TRAITORS, AND HOW HE MET A TRUE

WOMAN....         . ...     152

XXXVIII. ROBERT THE BRUCE—THE TAKING OF PERTH .             168


CONTENTS                             xi

CHAT.                                                                                                                                                                                           PAGE

XXXIX. ROBERT THE BRUCE —HOW TWO CASTLES WERE

WON....         . ....163

XL. ROBERT THE BRUCE—HOW THE CASTLE OF EDIN­
BURGH WAS TAKEN
....
         . .167

XLL ROBERT THE BRUCE—HOW SIR HENRY DE BOHUN

MET HIS DEATH....         . ..171

XLII. ROBERT THE BRUCE—THE STORY OF THE BATTLE

OF BANNOCKBURN....         . .176

XLIII. ROBERT THE BRUCE —HOW THE SCOTS CARRIED

THE WAR INTO ENGLAND ....         . 179

XLIV. ROBERT THE BRUCE—THE HEART OF THE KING . . 185

XLV. DAVID II.—THE STORY OF BLACK AGNES .          . 189

XLVI. DAVID II.—THE BATTLE OF NEVILLES CROSS           . 193

XLVII. ROBERT II. — HOW THE FRENCH AND THE SCOTS

MADE WAR ON ENGLAND ....         . 197

XLVIII. ROBERT II.—THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF OTTER-
BURN
          ....         . ...202

XLIX. ROBERT III.—THE STORY OF A FEARFUL HIGHLAND

TOURNAMENT....         . ..207

L. ROBERT III. —THE STORY OF THE DUKE OF

ROTHESAY....         . ...211

LI. REGENT ALBANY—THE STORY OF THE BATTLE OF

HARLAW....         . ...216

LII. REGENT MURDOCH—THE SCOTS IN FRANCE . .          . 220

LIII. JAMES I.—THE BEAUTIFUL LADY OF THE GARDEN. . 224

LIV. JAMES I.—THE POET KING, HOW HE REIGNED, AND

HOW HE DIED....         . ..229

LV. JAMES II. OF THE FIERY FACE —THE STORY OF

THE BLACK DINNER....         . .237


xii                   SCOTLAND’S STORY

LVI. JAMES II. OF THE FIERY FACE—THE FALL OF THE

BLACK DOUGLASES .            .          .            .            . .244

LVII. JAMES III.—THE STORY OF THE BOYDS         .          . 251

LVIII. JAMES III.—HOW A MASON BECAME AN EARL        . 254

LIX. JAMES III.—THE BATTLE OF SAUCHIEBURN .          . 269

LX. JAMES IV.—THE STORY OF A GREAT SEA FIGHT    . 263

LXI. JAMES IV.—THE THISTLE AND THE ROSE .          . 268

LXII. JAMES IV.—FLODDEN FIELD .          .          .          . 275

LXIII. JAMES V., THE KING OF THE COMMONS—THE FALL

OF THE RED DOUGLASES                                        . 279

LXIV. JAMES V., THE KING OF THE COMMONS —THE

STORY OF JOHNNIE ARMSTRONG .          .          . 285

LXV. JAMES V.—THE GOODMAN OF BALLENGIECH           . 289

LXVI. JAMES V., THE KING OF THE COMMONS—HIS LAST

DAYS         .......     292

LXVII. MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS—FRANCE                    .          .     296

LXVIII. MARY—DARNLEY AND RIZZIO....         . .     303

LXIX. MARY—BOTHWELL....         . ..     309

LXX. MARY—HOW THE QUEEN ESCAPED, AND HOW SHE

WAS MADE PRISONER AGAIN          .          .          . 316

LXXI. JAMES VI. — KING’S MEN AND QUEENS MEN .          . 321

LXXII. JAMES VI.—ABOUT THE DEATH OF TWO QUEENS

AND THE JOINING OF TWO CROWNS .          . 328

LXXIII. JAMES VI.—NEW SCOTLAND ....         . . 333

LXXIV. CHARLES I.—THE KING AND THE COVENANT          . 336

LXXV. CHARLES I.—HOW THE SOLDIER POET HELPED

THE KING....         . .. 340

LXXVI. CROMWELL—HOW THE SOLDIER POET DIED           . 344

CMAP.                                                                                                                                                                                         PAGE


CONTENTS                            xiii

CHAP.                                                                                                                                                                                         PAGE

LXXVIL CROMWELL—FOR THE CROWN           .          .          .348

LXXVIII. CHARLES II.—HOW THE KING CAME TO HIS OWN

AGAIN....           .          .          . 363

LXXIX. CHARLES II.—THE CHURCH AMONG THE HILLS . 357

LXXX. JAMES VII.—A FORLORN HOPE          .          .          .363

LXXXL JAMES VII.—THE BATTLE OF KILLIECRANKIE . 367

LXXXII. WILLIAM III. AND MARY II.THE STORY OF THE

GLEN OF WEEPING           .          .          .            370

LXXXIII. WILLIAM III.—FORTUNE’S GILDED SAILS .          .     374

LXXXIV. ANNE—HOW THE UNION JACK WAS MADE          .     382

LXXXV. GEORGE I.—FOR THE KING OVER THE WATER   .     387

LXXXVI. GEORGE II.A STORY OF SMUGGLERS .          .     392

LXXXVII. GEORGE II.—THE STORY OF HOW PRINCE

CHARLIE CAME HOME . . . . . . 399

LXXXVIII. GEORGE II. — THE WANDERINGS OF BONNIE

PRINCE CHARLIE . . . . . . . 406

LXXXIX. GEORGE III.—ABOUT A GREATER CONQUEROR

THAN KINGS           .          .          . 411

XC. GEORGE IV.—GOD SAVE THE KING .           .          . 414

LIST OF KINGS FROM DUNCAN I . . . 419


INDEX . . . . . . . . . 423
[BELOW]


[ INDEX to Scotland's Story ]

Achaius, Kino, makes a league with

Charlemagne, 19-22.
Agricola in Scotland, 6-9.
Albany, John Duke of (Regent), 280-1.
A
lbany, Robert Duke of, 207-8, 212-

14 ; Regent, 216.
Alexa
nder I. (the Fierce), and the

robber lord of Mearns, 68 ; and the

traitors, 69.
Alexander II., 81-85.
Alexa
nder III., crowning and marriage

of, 86-7 ; tames the ‘ Ravens,’ 90-3 ;

death, 99-100.
Alexander, Sir William, colonises

Nova Scotia, 333-5.
Alnwick, Malcolm Canmore killed at,

62-3 ; William the Lion’s tourn
me
nt at, 78-9.
Angus, Earls of (Red Douglases). See

Douglas.
Anne, Queen, 383, 387.
Antonine’s Wall, 10.
Argvll, Duke of, at Sheriffmuir, 389-

90.
Argyll, Marquis of, 349 ; execution of,

366.
Argyll, Earl of, his rebellion, 363-4 ;

his execution, 365-6.
Arran, Bruce in, 144.
Arran, James Stewart, Earl of, 325-7.
Arran, the Regent, 296, 299.
Armstrong, Johnnie, 286-288.
Ayr, the Black Parliament of, 115-117.

Babington Conspiracy, the, 328.

Baliol, Bernard de, 72, 78.

Baliol, John (King), swears fealty to

Edward I., 102-3 ; 104-9.
Baliol, Edwa
rd, claims the Crown,

189-91. 195.

Ballengiech, the Goodman of, 289-91.
Bank of England founded, 375.
Bannockburn, battle of, 171-8 ; its

effect, 178.
Banquo, the murder of, 38.
Barns of Ayr, the, 115-17.
Barons, rise of the, 197, 206.
Barton, Sir Andrew (admiral), 264,

270.
Battles, three hundred and fourteen,

between Scots and English, 386.
Baugé, Scots assist French at the battle

of, 220-1.
Beaton, Cardinal, 296, 297-8.
Beaufort, Lady Jane, marries James I.,

229-30.
Bell-the-Cat,’ 257.
Bell, Henry, 413.
Berwick, siege of, 106-7.
Binning takes Linlithgow Castle,

163-4.
Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane,

45-9.
Bisset, Walter, and the Earl of Athole,

83-4.
Black Agnes, the story of, 191-2.
Black bull’s head the sign of death,

242.
Black Death in Scotland, 193.
Black Dinner in Edinburgh Castle,

238-43.
Bohun, Sir Henry de, 174-5.
Border reivers, James v. subdues the.

285-8.
Bothwell and Queen Mary, 310-15.
Bothwellhaugh, Hamilton of, assassin

ates the Regent Murray, 321.
Boundary of Scotland, the old, 59.
Boyds, the sto
ry of the, 252-3.
‘British Solomon
,’ the, 335.
423

INDEX


424                  SCOTLAND S STORY

Britons and Saxons, war between, and

the Picts and Scots, 12-13.
Bruces :—

Robert de, 72, 73.

Robert de (Competitor), 102-3.

Robert de, marries Countess of

Carrick, 94-7, 105, 109.
Edward, 169, 172.
Nigel, 140-2.
Bruce, King Robert the. See Robert I.
Buchan, Countess of, puts the Crown
on B
ruce’s head, 137 ; imprisoned in
a cage, 142
.
Burgh­on-Sands, death of Edward I.

at, 158.
‘ Burned Candlemas,’ the, 195.
‘ Butcher ’ Cumberland, 404.

Caledonia, name given to Darien,

378.
Carberry Hill, the surrender at, 314.
Carrick, Marjorie Countess of, ‘ takes

captive ’ Robert de Bruce, 94-7.
Castle Douglas, 187.
Charles I., his tyranny, 336-7 ; sur­
renders to the Scots, 343.
Charles II. signs the Covenant, 348 ;

crowned, 349 ; his restoration, 354-

6 ; and the Covenanters, 357-62.
Charlie, the sto
ry of Prince, 399-410.
Church among the Hills, the, 357-62.
Clan Kay and Clan Chattan, fight

between, 208-10.
Claverhouse, Graham of (Viscount

Dundee), 367 ; at Killiecrankie,

368-9.
Cochrane, Earl of Mar (favourite of

James III.), 254-8.
Columba, St, the story of, 14-18.
Comet, the first Clyde steamboat, 413.
Commonwealth, the rule of the, 353-4.
Competitors, twelve, for the Crown,

102.
Comyn, Bruce and the Red, 131-5.
Congregation, the Lords of the, 300-1.
Constable of France, a Scottish,

221.
Covenanters, the, 338-47, 356-62,

367-48.
Conventicles, the, 357-61.
Crichton, Sir William, 238-42.
Cromwell, Oliver, 344, 349-50, 353.
Cromwell, Richa
rd, 353.
‘ Crowning mercy,’
Cromwell’s, 350.

Crusades, the, 80-1.
Culloden, batt
le of, 404.

Dalswinton Loch, first steamboat tried

on, 413.
Dalyell, General, 360.
Danes invade Scotland, 29.
Darien Scheme, the, 375-82 ; obstructed

by English and Dutch, 377.
Darnley, marries Queen Mary, 304 :
Rizzio and, 305-8 ; murde
r of, 309-
12
.
David I. (‘ the Sore Saint’), 70-76.
Da
vid II., 189-96.
Dead man who won a battle, 205.
Derby, Prince Charlie at, 403.
Donald Bane (or White), 37, 65, 66.
Donald of the Isles and the battle of

Harlaw, 216-17.
Douglas, Earls of (Black Douglases) :—
Si
r James the, 140, 156, 160; takes
Roxbu
rgh Castle, 164-6 ; 172,
173, 179, 182-3 ; and the Heart
o
f Bruce, 185-8.
A
rchibald, 238.
William, 238 ; at the Black Dinner,

241-2.
Gross James,’ 244.
William, his insolence, 244-6 ;

stabbed by James II., 246-8.
James, his rebellion and fall, 247-8.
Douglas, Earls of Angus (Red Dou­
glases
) :—

Archibald, 5th Earl (‘Bell-the-

Cat’), 257-8.
Archibald, 6th Earl, marries Mar­
ga
ret Tudor, 279.
Douglas, Catherine (‘ Barlass’), 233.
Douglas, claims the crown, 197 ; and
Otte
rburn, 202-5 ; ‘ Tine-man,’ 221-
2 ;
Wars, 324.
Douglases, power of the, 238, 248 ;
tyranny of the, 281 ;
fall of the
Blac
k, 244-8 ; fall of the Red, 281-4.
Drunken Parliament, the, 356.
Dukes, the first Scottish, 207.
Dumfries, the Red Comyn slain at,

134-5.
Dunbar, battle of, 349.
Dunbar Castle, Black Agnes at siege

of, 191-2 ; Queen Mary at, 313.
Duncan I. (the Gracious), and his

murder, 33-6.
Duncan II.. 65.


INDEX                                 425

Dunfermline Abbey, burial place of
Queen Marga
ret and Robert the
Bruce, 64, 186.

Dunse Law, the Scots army at, 339.

Dupplin Moor, battle of, 190.

Edgar, King of Scots, his dream,

66 ; 67.
Edinbu
rgh, 211 ; execution of Mon-

trose at, 346-7 ; the Porteous Riot

at, 396-8.
Edinbu
rgh Castle, taken by Randolph,

167-8 ; the Black Dinner in, 238-43 ;

siege of, 324-5 ; 415-16.
Edward I., 98 ; chooses John Baliol

king, 101-3 ; at siege of Berwick,

106-7 ; dying commands, 159.
Edward II., 158, 159, 169-70 ; at

Bannockburn, 171-8 ; dethroned,

179.
Edward III., 179-84 ; his invasions of

Scotland, 191, 195, 196.
Elizabeth, Queen, and Queen Mary,

300, 319-20, 328-30 ; death of, 331.
‘ End o
f an old song,’ the, 386.
English King invades Scotland for the

last time, 212.

Falkirk, battles of, 121-5, 403-4.
Falkland, castle of, Duke of Rothesay

in, 213-14 ; escape of James v. from,

281-4.
‘ F
ifteen,’ the, 388.
Flemish merchants of Berwick, the

brave, 107.
F
lodden, the story of, 275-8.
Flora Macdonald and Prince Charlie,

406-9.
Forts built by Agricola, 7.
Forty-five,’ the, 404.
Fotheringay Castle, execution of Queen

Mary in, 328-30.
‘ Friar of Ayr’s Blessing,’ 117.
F
rench and Scots, ancient friendship

of, 19-22, 194 ; make war against

England, 198, 201 ; Scots Guard,

222.

Galgacus (Caledonian chief), 7-8.
Gathe
lus, the story of Prince, 1-4.
Geddes, Jenny, and the ‘ Mass Book
,

337-8.
Geo
rge I., 387-92.
Geo
rge II., 392, 414.

George III., 414.

George IV.’s visit to Scotland, 414-17.

Gillies’ Hill, 172, 177.

Glencoe, Massacre of, 370-5.

Gowrie Conspiracy, 326-7.

Graham, Sir John the, 113, 124-5.

Graham, Sir Robert the, 231-5, 237.

Graham’s Dyke, 10.

Great Michael built by James IV., 265.

Great Supplication, the, 339.

Greyfriars Churchyard, Edinburgh,

signing of the National Covenant

in, 338.

Haco, King, defeat and death of, 90-

93.
Hadrian’s Wall, 10, 11, 12.
Halidon Hill, battle of, 191.
Harlaw, battle of, 216-18.
Hay family ennobled at battle of Lun-

carty, 30-2.
Henry viii., 296-7.
Henry III. of England appoints a

Scottish Regent, 89.
Hiberus, 3, 4.

Highland Host, ravages of the, 360-1.
Ho
lyrood Palace, 332, 355, 401.
Hotspur, Harry, 202-5.
Howieson, Jock, and the King, 289-91.
Huntingdon, David I. swears fealty to

English King as Earl of, 70.
Hy, ancient name of Iona, 15.

Iona, St. Columba and, 15-18 ; burial
p
lace of kings, 28 ; 29.

Jacobite Rising, of 1715, 388-91 ; of

1746, 399-410.
Jacob
ites, why so called, 368.
James I. (the ‘ Poet King ’), in prison in

England, 214-15 ; and the lady of the

garden, 224-8 ; his wise rule, 230-1 ;

his assassination, 232-6.
James II. (‘ Fiery Face’), 237-50 ; killed

at Roxburgh Castle, 249.
James III., 251-3 ; his favourites,

254-8 ; at Sauchieburn, 260-2.
James IV., 263-78 ; marries Margaret

Tudor, 269-70 ; at Flodden, 275-8.
James v. (the King of the Commons),

breaks the power of the Douglases,

281-4 ; subdues the Border reivers,

285-8 ; and Jock Howieson, 289-91 ;

292-5.


426                  SCOTLANDS STORY

James VI., succeeds to throne of Eng­
land, 331-2 ; 333-6
.

James VII. driven from his kingdom,
367-8.

John an unlucky name, 207.

John of England ravages Scotland, 88-9.

John of the Leaden Sword, 222.

Kennedy, Bishop, 251-2.

Kenneth Macalpine, 24 ; his ruse with

the lords, 26-6 ; 27-8.
Kenneth III
. at the battle of Luncarty,

29-31.
Killiecrankie, battle of, 368-9.
Killing Time,’ the, 362, 367.
‘King over the water,’ 387-91.
Kings (Jacobite) who never ruled,

409-10.
King’s men and Queen’s men, struggle

between, 321-7.
King’s Quair, James I.’s poem, 225.
Kirkcaldy of Grange, 322-5.
Kirk o‘ Field, the tragedy of, 311-12.
Kirkpatrick ‘ maks siccar,’ 135.
Knox, John, 300-1 ; and Queen Mary,

304 ; 316.

Langside, battle of, 319.

Largs, battle of, 90-3.

Lauder bridge, the cat belled ’ at,
256-8.

Lauderdale, Duke of, 360.

Lennox, the Regent, 322.

Leslie, Sir Alexander, 339.

Leslie, General David, 343.

Lilies of France in the Scottish
standa
rd, 22.

Linlithgow, Binning’s capture of, 163-
4 ; abduction of James III. from,
252 ; bi
rth of Queen Mary at, 295 ;
Regent Mu
rray assassinated at,
321-2.

Livingstone, Sir Alexander, 239.

Loch Leven Castle, Queen Mary im­
p
risoned in, 316-18.

Lulath’s rebellion against Malcolm
Canmo
re, 51.

Luncarty, battle of, 29-32.

Macbeth, and the Weird Sisters, 34-
6, 39 ; and the murder of 8anquo,
38 ; his c
ruelty, 39, 44 ; slain, 49.

Macdonald, Flora, 406-9.

Macduff, Thane of Fife, 41-50.

Mackay, General, at Killieerankie,
368-9
.

Mackenzie, Roderick, taken for Prince
Charlie, and executed, 408.

Maitland of Lethington, 322-5.

Malcolm III. (Canmore or Bighead),
37, 45-9 ; King, 50 ; how he over­
came a t
raitor, 51-4 ; marries
P
rincess Margaret, 56; slain at
A
lnwick, 62-3.

Malcolm IV. (‘the Maiden’), 76-7.

Mar, Earl of, his ‘ hunting-party,’
388-91.

Mar, the Regent, 323.

Margaret, Queen, comes to Scotland,
55-6 ; her piety and learning, 58 ;
death o
f, 63.

Margaret Tudor, marries James IV.,
269-
70 ; marries Earl of Angus, 279.

Margaret’s Hope, 55.

Mary of Guise, 296 ; Regent, 298,
300, 301.

Mary Queen of Scots, birth, 295 ; in
F
rance, 299-302 ; returns to Scot­
land, 303 ; marries Darnley, 304 ;
R
izzio and, 305-8 ; Kirk o‘ Field,
309-12 ; marries Bothwell, 313 ;
abdicates, 316 ; escapes
from Loch
Leven Castle, 317-18 ; a prisoner in
Eng
land, 319-20 ; her execution,
328-31.

Mason becomes an earl, 254-6.

Matilda, Princesses, the four, 71.

Melrose Abbey, the Heart of Bruce
and ‘Otte
rburn’ Douglas buried in,
18
7, 205.

Menteith, Sir John de, betrays Wallace,
127-9.

Methven, battle of, 138-9.

Monk, General, 350 ; brings back the
King, 354.

Montrose, John Baliol surrenders his
th
rone at, 108.

Montrose, the Great Marquis of, how
he
fought for the King, 341-5 ; his
execut
ion, 346-7.

Morton, the Regent, 323-6.

Murdoch, the Regent, 220-3.

Murray, the Regent, 304, 305, 316,
319
, 320 ; assassinated, 321-2.

National Covenant, the, 338-9.
Na
vy, rise of the Scottish, 264-5.
Neville’s Cross, battle of, 194-5


Norsemen defeated by Alexander iii.,
90-3.

Northampton, Peace of, Scottish in­
dependence secured by
, 184.

Northumbria held from the King of
England, 61.

Norway, Maid of, 98, 101-2.

Nova Scotia, the founding of, 333-5.

Ogilvie, George, saves the Regalia,
350-2.

‘Old Mr. Melancholy’ (the Old Pre­
tende
r), 390.

Orkney and Shetland given to James
iii. as a wedding p
resent, 253.

Orkney, Montrose in, 345.

Otterburn, battle of, 202-5.

Over-lordship of Scotland claimed by
Eng
lish Kings, 61, 80, 84, 87, 88, 98,
102, 103, 190, 195, 211, 293.

Parliament, sanctions the Reforma­
tion
, 301 ; Riding of the, 355 ; the
last
, 384.

Paterson, William (founder of the
Bank of England
), 375.

Perth, the taking of, 160-3 ; battle
between the Clans at
, 208-10 ; assas­
sination of James I. at, 232-6.

Philiphaugh, battle of, 343.

Picts, the, 5, 16-17 ; war between
Scots and
, 24-8.

Pierce-eye (or Percy), the story of,
62-3.

Pinkie, battle of, 298.

Ploughman wins a battle, 29-32.

Porteous Riot, the, 395-8.

Prestonpans, battle of, 401-2.

Protestant martyr in Scotland, the
fi
rst, 219.

Puritans and Covenanters, 340-1.

Randolph, Earl of Moray, 160 ; takes
Ed
inburgh Castle, 167-8 ; loses and
recovers a ‘rose from his chaplet,’
1
73-4 ; 179, 183, 189.

‘ Ravens,’ the taming of the, 90-93.

Rebellion, the Great, 340.

‘ Redshanks,’ English name for the
Scots, 184
.

Reformation, the, 292, 300-1.

Regalia, how it was saved, 350-2 ;
loc
ked away, 385 ; and again r
co
vered, 414-16.

Resby, John, first Protestant martyr,

219.
Rescisso
ry Act, what it provided, 356.
Resto
ration, the, 354-5.
Re
volution, the Glorious, 367-8.
Richard of the Lion Heart frees William

the Lion from fealty, 80, 81.
Riding of the Parliament, 355-6 ; the

last, 384.
Rizzio, David, murder of, 305-8.
Robe
rt I. (the Bruce), meets Wallace on

the field of Falkirk, 125-6 ; and the

Red Comyn, 131-5 ; crowned, 135-7 ;

at battle of Methven, 138-9 ; his

adventures, 140-2, 144-51, 156-61 ;

and the spider, 143 ; his escape from

traitors, 152-4 ; at Bannockburn,

171-84 ; the Heart, of the King,

185-8.
Robert the High Steward (Robert II.),

193, 195, 197-206.
Robert III., 207-15.
Romans in Scotland, 6-9 ; built forts

and walls, 7, 10 ; the period of their

occupation, 12.
Rothesay, David, Duke of, 207-211

his death, 213-14.
Rothsay, Scots Prince, 4.
Roxburgh Castle, taken by the Black

Douglas, 164-6 ; James II. killed at,

249 ; 251.
Rullion G
reen, battle of, 359-60.
‘ Run-about-Raid,’ the, 305.
Ruthven, Raid of, 326-7.

St. Giles, Edinburgh, 337-8.
Sauchiebu
rn, battle of, 259-62.
Saxons, Britons call in the, 12-13.
Scone, 50, 136, 190, 198, 349.
Scota, wife to Gathelus, 1, 2.
Scotia (meaning Ireland), 4.
Scots Guard in France, 222.
Scots, the early, in Spain and Ireland,

2-4 ; come to Scotland, 5 ; their

method of fighting the English, 201
Scott, Sir Walter, 415.
Seafights between Scots and English,

266-7, 270-4.
Security, Act of, passed, 383.
Severus, the Emperor, in Scotland, 11.
Sharpe, James, Archbishop of St

Andrews, 357, 361.
8he
riffmuir, battle of, 388-9.
Sinclai
r, Oliver, 294.

INDEX                               427


428                  SCOTLANDS STORY

Smugglers, a story of, 392-8.

Soldier poet who helped the King,

341-7.
Solway Moss, battle of, 293-4.
Somerleds rebellion, 76.
Spaniards attack the Darien colonists,

380-1.
Spider, Bruce and the, 143.
Stair, Master of, and the Massacre of

Glencoe, 37l-3 ; 376.
Standard, battle of the, 7l-4.
Standard of Scotland (how it was

made), 22.
Stephen Bull, 266-7.
Stewart sovereigns, the first of the,

197 ; the last of the, 387.
Stirling Bridge, battle of, 118-20.
Stirling Castle, 168, 239, 246.
Stone of Destiny, legend of the, 60 ;

80 ; removed to Westminster, 109.
Succession, Act of, passed, 383.

Tartans, when first worn, 57.
Thane (title meaning Earl), 34.
Thistle and the Rose, marriage of the,

268.
Thistle, Order of the, founded, 23.
Three hundred and fourteen battles

between Scots and English, 386.
‘Tine man’ Douglas, 221-2.

Tobacco, introduction of, 335.
‘Toom Tabard’ (John Baliol), 108-9.
Tournament, a fearful Highland, 208-

10.
Twelve competitors for the Crown,

102.

Union Jack, how it was made, 386-6.
Union of the Crowns, 332.
Union of the Parliaments, 383-6.

Wallace, Sir William, his adven­
tures, 110-14 ; the Black Parliament
of Ayr, 117 ; at Stirling Bridge, 118-
20 ; at Falkirk, 121-6 ; betrayed
and executed, 127-30.

Walter the Steward, 38, 197.

Watt, James, and the steam-engine,
411-13.

‘ Wee bit hassock o’ land,’ 156.

William the Conqueror and Malcolm
Canmore, 59-60.

William (the Lion), 78 ; a prisoner in
England, 80 ; 81.

William III. (of Orange) and the Glori­
ous Revolution, 367, 383.

Wishart, George, 298.

Wood, Sir Andrew (admiral), 263-4
265.

Wooing, a rough, 297.


[ WHY WAS SCOTLAND'S STORY WAS WRITTEN ]

WHY THIS BOOK WAS WRITTEN

‘ It is very nice,’ said Caledonia, as she closed her book
with a sigh ; ‘ but why did you not tell us stories of
Scotland ?

‘ Because there was no need. That has been done
already by a great and clever man.

Oh, but children sometimes like the stories which are
written by the not great and clever people best,’ said
Caledonia wisely. ‘ Littler children do, anyhow. They
are more simpler, you know.’

‘ Oh indeed ! said I.

I wish you would write Scotland‘s Story for littler
children like me,’ went on Caledonia, ‘ and please put
more battles in it than in Our Island Story. But you
must not say that the Scots were defeated. I don‘t like
it at all when you say The Scots and the Picts were
driven back.”

‘But you know we were defeated sometimes, Caledonia.’

Caledonia looked grave. That was very serious. Pre­
sently her face brightened. ‘ Well, if we were, you needn
t
write about those times,’ she said.

So, because Caledonia asked me, I have written Scot-
land‘s Story. I am afraid it will not please her altogether,
for I have had to say more than once or twice that


viii                    SCOTLANDS STORY

‘ the Scots were defeated.’ But I would remind her that
‘ defeated
and ‘ conquered are words with quite different
meanings, and that perhaps it is no disgrace for a plucky
little nation to have been defeated often, and yet never
conquered by her great and splendid neighbour.

‘ Fairy tales ! I hear some wise people murmur as
they turn the pages. Yes, there are fairy tales here, and
I make no apology for them, for has not a grave and
learned historian said that there ought to be two histories
of Scotland one woven with the golden threads of
romance and glittering with the rubies and sapphires of
Fairyland ? Such, surely, ought to be the children
s
Scotland.

So I dedicate my book to the ‘ littler children,’ as
Caledonia calls them, who care for their country
s story-
It is sent into the world in no vain spirit of rivalry,
but rather as a humble tribute to the great Master of
Romance, who wrote Tales for his little grandson, and I
shall be well repaid, if my tales but form stepping-stones
by which little feet may pass to his Enchanted Land.

H. E. MARSHALL.

 


 

ADVERTISEMENTS AT FRONT OF SCOTLAND'S STORY

SCOTLAND’S STORY


BY H. E. MARSHALL

OUR EMPIRE STORY : A History of the
British Empire for Boys and Girls. With
20 coloured pictures by J. R. Skelton.

SCOTLAND‘S STORY : A History of Scot­
land for Boys and Girls. With 20 colour
drawings by J. R. Skelton and others.

ENGLISH LITERATURE for Boys and
Girls, with 20 reproductions in colour from
original drawings by J. R. Skelton.

OUR ISLAND STORY : A History of Eng­
land for Boys and Girls. With 30 coloured
pictures by A. S. Forrest.

KINGS AND THINGS : First Stories from
English History. With 8 coloured pictures
by Lanta Spurrier.


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